2K Games Wins the Right To Store and Share Your Biometric Facial Data

In October 2015, two gamers who used face-scanning tech found in 2K Games’ NBA series to create more realistic avatars filed a lawsuit against the company as they were concerned about how 2K would store and use their biometric data. On Monday, however, a New York federal judge ruled that neither games’ biometric face scanning tech had established ‘sufficient injury’ to the plaintiffs, implying that their concerns over privacy were unfounded. Engadget reports: Using your console’s camera, the company employs face-scanning tech in its popular NBA series, with both 2K’s NBA 2K16 and 2K15 using the data to help players create more accurate avatars. In order to use the tech, players must first agree to 2K’s terms and conditions, consenting that after scanning them their face may be made visible to others. While the plaintiffs agreed to the publisher’s terms, the court case arose because the gamers claimed that 2K never made clear made clear that scans would be stored indefinitely and biometric data could be shared. With little evidence to suggest how their privacy would be at risk, the judge gave 2K the benefit of the doubt. Still, no matter the outcome, it’s a landmark case, with biometric data sure to play an increasingly important role in identifying individuals in the future. While there is certainly nothing that suggests that 2K will use the data for nefarious means, the result of this case does raise some interesting questions about who owns the right to your digital likeness.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Source: SlashDot

WSJ: Facebook building video app for Apple TV and other set-top boxes as it ramps up its original programming efforts (Todd Spangler/Variety)


Todd Spangler / Variety:

WSJ: Facebook building video app for Apple TV and other set-top boxes as it ramps up its original programming efforts  —  Facebook is developing an app for set-top boxes including Apple TV, as a way to bring longer-form video content — and video ads — to big-screen TVs in consumers’ living rooms, the Wall Street Journal reported.


Source: TechMeme